Planning an Integrated Marketing Campaign for the New Year

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We’re all connected to the businesses around us in a variety of ways: social media posts, direct mail flyers, advertisements in favorite magazines, commercials on television, and even ads pasted on the sides of buses. Many businesses, wanting to reach as wide an audience as possible, will advertise using a variety of channels. An integrated marketing campaign involves creating a clear, uniform message that will resonate across all of those channels, increasing name-recognition and driving sales. If that sounds like something your company is looking to do, here are some ways to start developing a plan.

 Refining the brand message 

Integrated marketing campaigns focus around building brand recognition. Take, for example, Apple. When someone views the Apple logo, they don’t mistake it for an actual drawing of the fruit. They see the company associated with it and the crisp and clean nature of the technology it creates. The same goes for the Nike swoosh and the slogan “Just Do It.” The logo actually inspires people to go out for a run. These brands have been immensely successful in determining their company message and sending it out uniformly across all channels. 

It can seem overwhelming for a small business to compete with that level of success, but the key is to start simple. Determine what centralized message customers should draw from a commercial or ad. Summarize the top selling qualities of the business in just a few words.

Taking the message to the street

 Remember that no one company can be everything to everyone. Instead, identify a central message and develop a targeted campaign that can be used across different advertising platforms. If a potential customer hears about your company on Facebook, they should come away with the same impression as someone who first heard your name on the radio. This will help them make the connection between the advertisements. Then, when they see a second ad on a bus while driving to work, they’ll think, “Oh yeah, I’ve heard of those guys!” If the different ads had completely different messages, the odds of that prospect making the connection would be much smaller. For smaller and newer companies, this can be deadly. 

Bring everything back

 As you develop your message and the ads you want to use, remember to bring everything back to your website. For most companies, their website is a central point for attracting and engaging customers. This means that all advertising should work at steering people toward that site. Your website should provide contact information, more information about your products and services, and additional incentives to get prospects to buy from you. 

 Customers like things easy, though. Make sure your online ads provide a clear link that’s easy, appealing, and straightforward. If customers have to look for it, chances are they won’t. This part can be a bit more challenging with paper advertising, since few people are going to remember a long web address. To help these customers, consider adding a QR code or a simplified URL. Also try to keep the website address as catchy and easy to remember as possible.

Creating an integrated marketing campaign can be a fantastic business move. In the modern world, there are countless platforms for advertising and communicating with potential clients. A well-orchestrated campaign will not only reach a large audience, but it will also help increase brand recognition and drive people back to your website. The new year offers a perfect opportunity to get started with a bang by putting these marketing strategies to work for you.

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Keeping Leads Alive and Healthy

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No business can thrive without leads to drive sales. While finding quality leads is challenging enough, maintaining and converting those leads can be even more difficult. As you think about your sales strategy for the new year, consider these ideas for keeping prospective buyers interested and active.

 

Take Your Time

Nobody wants to feel as though they’re being overtly sold a particular product or pressured into making a buying decision that might not be right for them. Yet many sales reps are very quick to launch right into a sales pitch or offer quick-fix solutions without fully understanding a prospect’s needs. This approach tends to turn off a lot of prospects and quickly kill leads. 

 

Instead of launching right into your sales speech, start the conversation without broaching the subject of sales at all. For example, if the lead came from a list of customers who are using an outdated software system, begin by asking how the current system is working for them. Some companies may not even realize that they should consider updating. Approaching the subject from this perspective can seem less pushy and help the prospective customer feel more comfortable talking with you. From there, you can gradually ease into a more sales-oriented conversation.

 

Build Rapport

Get to know your prospect and their particular needs before discussing budgets and product specifications. Then tailor your approach accordingly. Establish rapport and let your customer see that you have a genuine interest in solving their problem, not just making a sale. Even if you don’t make an immediate sale, your prospect will leave the meeting with a more positive impression of your company and will be more likely to turn to you when they’re ready to make a purchase in the future. 

 

Follow Up

Don’t make your first meeting with a prospect your last contact with that person. Follow up to remind them what you talked about and to keep your name top of mind. A poll conducted by B2B Marketing Magazine found that 69 percent of buyers preferred to have companies follow up with them through e-mail. Telephone follow-up finished a distant second, at 17 percent. SCi Sales Group found that 52 percent of buyers expected a call back from companies within one day, and another 36 percent said they expected to hear back from a company within five days. Failure to meet buyers’ expectations on these issues can result in a variety of missed opportunities. 

 

Resurrecting Dead Leads

Sometimes, despite the best of intentions, leads die. Some, however, can still be resurrected. Successfully generating sales from a dead lead requires tact and the right tools.

 

Once a lead has gone cold, it can be difficult to determine if the prospect still has a need for your product. Your first step should be to determine this potential. Remember again that prospects don’t appreciate pushy sales tactics. Instead, try sending a brief, one or two line email to determine if they’re still interested in your product. If the response is positive, follow up right away with a phone call, asking for a time to sit down and meet. In your meeting, steer the conversation toward the prospect’s needs and solving their problems, rather than focusing on your product or pushing for a sale. 

 

Keeping leads alive and healthy is an important part of doing business. In the rush to get as many leads as possible, it’s easy to let some leads die. These leads, however, can be a major source of revenue for your company. Learning how to keep leads alive or save those that have gone cold is an important skill… and one that can improve your company’s bottom line.