How to Produce Stellar Ad Copy in the Post-PC Era

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These days, the Internet has asserted its ubiquity on everything from social media and e-commerce to the way consumers communicate and get information. That said, printing and paper-based marketing are still strong — and that’s not about to change anytime soon. In this context, it’s either you adapt your ad copy to a mix of printing and digital or see your business fall by the wayside.

We don’t want that last part, do we?

Here are a few key items to consider as you gradually reshuffle your mixture of print and electronic copy.

Understand the cross-device reality
The first thing to understand is the notion of “cross-device” reality. That means your ad content must be accessible and sharable across devices as diverse as personal computers, tablets, smartphones, and notebooks, as well as on the printed page. For example, if you produce a sales letter you plan to mail and make accessible online, make sure you also make it readable on mobile devices. Specialists call this “responsive design,” meaning you optimize your content to be viewable on all types of devices.

Don’t forget shrink-proof paragraphs
Create shorter paragraphs to prevent the shrinkage that typically happens when you move from one browser to another or from a desktop to a smartphone or tablet. Believe it or not, a six or seven line paragraph on a desktop computer might appear fuzzy on a handheld device, turning it into an unreadable chunk that could only confuse and exacerbate your prospects and customers. So make your paragraphs concise and straight to the point. Ideally, you’ll want to limit yourself to around 250-400 characters. If possible, you can even adopt the “Twitter rule” and make the paragraph less than or equal to 140 characters.

Speak to the device
Marketers always say it’s all about content, content, content. It may be time to start thinking device, device, device. But remember that good old paper-based copy doesn’t come with device-compatibility constraints. That’s one reason experts continue to recommend non-electronic promotion as an added tactic. For electronic messaging, though, it’s imperative to consider your audience and the various devices they use to access it.

For example, someone checking your ad copy on a smartphone could be at a party or on their way home. Conversely, promotional content you send via desktop email will be read by consumers at work, home, school, and so forth. You get the point. The reader can’t be on the go with their PC. The issue of device compatibility is so important that even Google has spoken about it. The bottom line: adapt your ad copy to your target audience, their preferences, and the devices on which they’re more likely to read your ad copy.

Love modularity
Make your ad copy modular. You won’t regret it. Modular text is content that is not clearly stated in the initial ad copy, but that unfolds when the user shows interest in it or explores it. For example, say you run a fashion e-commerce portal and are running a campaign offering discounts on shoes. You can place modular content next to the footwear, so shoppers interested in, say, matching pants and shirts can buy these items as well.

Heed the power of structure
Structure is very important when it comes to producing stellar ad copy. The buzzword in the industry is content choreography, meaning the way you embed things like text, audio, video, and infographics into your content. You can structure your ad content the way you want, but make sure you keep three key things in mind: a clear description of your product or service; benefits or added value; and a call to action. 410-574-0780.

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